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By Dale Johnson Posted: November 28, 2017 3:45 p.m.

The Faculty of Nursing is offering more choices, with the new After Degree Nursing Program and the graduate Clinical Nurse Specialist program.
The Faculty of Nursing is offering more choices, with the new After Degree Nursing Program and the graduate Clinical Nurse Specialist program. Photo: U of R Photography

The University of Regina, in collaboration with Saskatchewan Polytechnic, launched two new programs for nursing students this semester.

One is the After Degree Nursing Program, for students who already have a university degree and want to complete a nursing degree in 24 calendar months. There are 18 students enrolled.

“We have had quite a number of students who have completed other degrees prior to entrance into the Saskatchewan Collaborative Bachelor of Science in Nursing (SCBScN) regular program, including some with master’s and PhDs. So, these students won't really be different than the regular SCBScN program – they will just take a slightly revised program and complete the program in 24 months rather than the three, three-and-half or four years in the regular program,” explains Dr. Robin Evans, Associate Professor and Associate Dean in the เครดิต ฟรี ถอน ได้ 2561Faculty of Nursing.

Students can enter with a degree in any discipline, as long as they have earned an average grade of 70%. Some nursing students have degrees in Biology, Chemical Engineering, Kinesiology, Health Studies, Human Justice, and Pharmacy.

“We used our regular SCBScN program as the basis and developed the program from there. Students will take a mixture of year one and two courses in the first two terms; then will follow the regular SCBScN program for year three and four courses,” Evans says.

Also new is a Master of Nursing Clinical Nurse Specialist program, one of two advanced nursing practice roles recognized in Canada; the other is Nurse Practitioner. This program is offered online and clinical practice will be arranged in each student's community.

“One student is from Saskatoon and has a specialty in gerontology, and one is from Regina who is specializing in addictions and community nursing,” says Dr. Glenn Donnelly, Associate Professor and Associate Dean of Graduate Programs and Research in the Faculty of Nursing.

In addition to the clinical nurse specialist’s clinical expertise, they are leaders in the health care system with a specific eye on improving patient care. Often they are involved in quality improvement activities and the research needed to support changes in health care practices.