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By Dale Johnson Posted: February 21, 2017 6:00 a.m.

After announcing plans in February 1968 for a Bilingual Centre, the official opening was held in 1973. Left to right: Gordon MacMurchy, Minister of Education; Hugh Faulkner, Secretary of State; Dr. John Archer, Regina Campus Principal; Dr. J.W.T. Spinks, U. of S. President, Saskatoon; B. Wilhelm, Acting Director.
After announcing plans in February 1968 for a Bilingual Centre, the official opening was held in 1973. Left to right: Gordon MacMurchy, Minister of Education; Hugh Faulkner, Secretary of State; Dr. John Archer, Regina Campus Principal; Dr. J.W.T. Spinks, U. of S. President, Saskatoon; B. Wilhelm, Acting Director. Photo: U of R Archives and Special Collections, 84-11 (35). 1973. U of R Photography, 73-072-1.

Among the historical highlights at the University of Regina and its forerunners during the month of February:

1910:  “METHODISTS TO BUILD $500,000 RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE IN REGINA” is a headline in the Leader newspaper. The article says organizers “were conscious of the fact that a nation could not be great because it had vast belts of wheat land. It was not great because it may have great mineral or forest or sea wealth. The real assets of a nation were to be found in the manhood and womanhood of the land.”

1951:  An engineer’s report finds the foundations of the gymnasium are in poor shape, and little can be done to save the building. The report also warns that Darke Hall is beginning to develop cracks along its west side, caused by excessively dry clay.

1954:  An editorial in the Leader-Post pushes for degree-granting status at Regina College, saying: “Now that we are approaching the Golden Jubilee of the province, the time is opportune to give Regina College its proper status, and enable it to function as a branch of the University, with power to give a full course leading to a B.A. degree, and thus render the public service of which it is capable if the handicap under which it has been carrying on for years past are now removed.”

1961:  Discussions are underway for a new name for Regina College, and the Leader-Post reports: “Some say it should remain Regina College. Others have suggested the University of Regina, University of Southern Saskatchewan, or USSR, the University of Southern Saskatchewan at Regina. Other names put forward were: Qu’Appelle University, Wascana University, Plains University, Riel College, and several unprintables.”

1963:  Principal Dr. W. A. Riddell outlines plans for Regina Campus at a speech at the Hotel Saskatchewan. “The university at Saskatoon has developed a fine reputation in the sciences. At the Regina campus, because of the unique resources to be found at the seat of government, there is an excellent chance for the development of social sciences. The immediate objective, however, is the development of a liberal arts college, as distinct from professional schools. The arts college is the basic unit of a university.”

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The third annual science show was held at the U of R on Feb 7, 1981.

Photo: U of R Archives and Special Collections, 2014-60 Box 21 File 399 Science Show 1981.

1968:  Plans are announced for a bilingual college at Regina Campus. Dr. T.  J. H. McLeod, vice-principal at the campus, says: “We felt this was one area where the university could make a contribution, which we hope will be substantial toward the whole problem of traditional Canadian language groups. This does not exclude the possibility of doing something to meet the needs of other language groups as time goes on.” What began as a bilingual college now is known as เครดิต ฟรี ถอน ได้ 2561La Cité.

1981:  The University of Regina holds its third annual science show. There are 80 exhibitors who want to demystify science for the public. Exhibits include how public opinion surveys are conducted, the science behind breathalyzer tests, and how radar guns work.

Related stories:

Sesquicentennial flashback: February 1967

FLASHBACK: January highlights in the history of the University of Regina

The battle to grant university degrees in Regina